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Pear Theatre. “In the Next Room, or, the Vibrator Play.” Through Oct. 1. By Sarah Ruhl. Directed by Caroline Clark. Featuring April Culver, Bradley Satterwhite, Ellen Dunphy, Troy Johnson, Stephanie Crowley, Damaris Divito and James Lewis. Pear Theatre, 1110 La Avenida St., Mountain View. $10-$35 (discounts available). www.thepear.org or 650-254-1148. TheatreWorks Silicon Valley. “Constellations.” Through Sept. 17. By Nick Payne. Directed by Robert Kelley. Featuring Robert Gilbert and Carie Kawa. Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View, $40-$100 (discounts available). theatreworks.org or 650-463-1960.

Palo Alto Players, “Million Dollar Quartet.” Sept, 16 through Oct, 1, Book by Colin Escott and Floyd Mutrux, Inspired by Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins, Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto, www.paplayers.org or 650-329-0891, Sunnyvale Community Players, “Fiddler on the Roof.” Sept, 16 through Oct, 8, latin dance shoes Book by Joseph Stein, Music by Jerry Bock, Lyrics by Sheldon Harnick, Directed by Steve Shapiro and Matt Welch, Sunnyvale Theatre, Sunnyvale Community Center, 550 E, Remington Drive, Sunnyvale, $27-33, sunnyvaleplayers.org or 408-733-6611..

Dragon Theatre. Aether Brigade’s “Tipsy Time Comedy and Variety Hour.” 10 p.m. (or slightly later; follows another show). Sept. 22. The Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway St., Redwood City. $17 advance, $20 door (includes beverage). www.dragonproductions.net; 650-493-2006, ext. 2; or tickets@dragonproductions.net. Palo Alto Players Staged Reading Companion Series. “Give It All Back.” Sept. 27. By Calamity West. Companion reading to “Million Dollar Quartet.” Free. Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. www.paplayers.org or 650-329-0891.

Peninsula Youth Theatre, “She Kills Monsters.” 2 p.m., 7:30 p.m, Sept, 23, By Qui Nguyen, Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts Second Stage, 500 Castro St., Mountain View, $17, mvcpa.com or 650-903-6000, TheatreWorks Silicon Valley, “The Prince of Egypt.” Oct, 6 through Nov, 5, Co-world premiere (in collaboration with Fredericia Teater in Denmark, where it will be staged in 2018) musical about Moses and Ramses, Score and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz, book by Philip LaZebnik, Directed by Scott Schwartz, Featuring Diluckshan Jeyaratnam and Jason Gotay, Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, latin dance shoes 500 Castro St., Mountain View, $40-$100 (discounts available), theatreworks.org or 650-463-1960..

Peninsula Youth Theatre. “Stories on Stage: Creepy Carrots.” 9:30 and 11 a.m. Oct. 13, and 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Oct. 14. Adaptation by Dexter Fidler of the book by Aaron Reynolds. Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts Second Stage, 500 Castro St., Mountain View. $8-$10. mvcpa.com or 650-903-6000. Upstage Theater. “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged).” 7:30 p.m. Oct. 20; 2 and 7:30 p.m. Oct. 21; 7:30 p.m. Oct. 22. Comedy covers 37 plays in less than two hours. Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts Second Stage, 500 Castro St., Mountain View. $17-$22. mvcpa.com or 650-903-6000.

After two years of laying the groundwork, San Francisco’s Yerba Buena Center for the Arts will debut Transform, a new festival latin dance shoes (Sept, 14-23) featuring commissioned works by seven local performance companies addressing the theme “Why citizenship?”, In an interview Isabel Yrigoyen, the center’s Associate Director of Performing Arts, said, “What most people don’t know or understand is what YBCA … curates.” She pointed out that, though LINES Ballet and Smuin are among the performing groups that rent the center’s facilities, Transform will “concentrate our own curatorial vision in a two-week period in the fall and another in the spring over the coming years.”..

Though many arts institutions are hierarchies, passing down aesthetic validation to the public from an elite few at the top, YBCA has implemented a new structure that is more democratic and community-based. Yrigoyen said, “In 2015, all staff members got to nominate people who inspire us — artists, scholars, teachers, activists, all kinds of people. Then from those names Executive Director Deborah Cullinan and a cabinet chose the final ‘YBCA 100’ list. “We had a summit where those people came together to share their stories — tell what their work is about and what inspires them. Out of the summit came many questions, and Marc Bamuthi Joseph, the Chief of Programming and Pedagogy, and his team looked at all of them and picked three that YBCA will be using as jumping-off points for the coming year: ‘Why citizenship?’; ‘How do we design freedom?’; and What does equity look like?’ ”.

In an interview Transform choreographers Wendy Rein and Ryan T, Smith of the contemporary dance company RAWdance described their project. Smith said, “We’re thinking about what it means and what it takes and why it’s important to be an informed citizen.”, Rein added, “So our piece is centered around recurring waves of anti-intellectualism that work against having an educated population. We’re looking at political acts against intellectuals — first at Mao in China, and then going back further and further in history, Our research latin dance shoes shows that this has been happening across the globe for centuries and centuries.”..


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